Tribute Band Concerts in Pennsylvania: September 2016

September

September 1-4, 2016: Get the Led Out (Led Zeppelin tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

September 2, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), Paradise Stream, Mount Pocono

September 2,  2016: BSTREETBAND (Bruce Springsteen Tribute Band), Parx Casino, Bensalem

September 3, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), Cove Haven, Lakeville

September 4, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), Stoneboro Fair, Stoneboro

September 5, 2016:  Ole 97 (Johnny Cash and June Carter tribute band), Juniata County Fair, Port Royal

September 15, 2016: Ole 97 (Johnny Cash and June Carter tribute band), Cookport Fair, Commodore

September 16, 2016: Ole 97 (Johnny Cash and June Carter tribute band), McClure Bean Soup Festival and Fair, McClure

September 17, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), McClure Bean Soup Festival and Fair, McClure

September 17, 2016: Tuesday’s Gone (Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute band), Parx Casino, Bensalem

September 18, 2016: Real Diamond (Neil Diamond tribute band), Parx Casino, Bensalem

 

 

PA Tribute Band Concerts: August 2016

August

-August 3, 2016: Bob Lougheed and the Memphis Mafia (Elvis tribute band), TD Bank Amphitheater, Bensalem

-August 5, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), Hard Rock Café, Pittsburgh

-August 6, 2016: Tony Sands: It was A Very Good Year (Frank Sinatra Tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

-August 10, 2016: Space Oddity (David Bowie tribute band), F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre

-August 12, 2016: Completely Unchained (Van Halen tribute band), Railroaders Memorial Museum, Altoona

-August 10, 2016: CSN Songs (Crosby, Stills, and Nash tribute band), TD Bank Amphitheater, Bensalem

-August 18, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), Beavertown Rescue Hose Co. #20, Beavertown

-August 21, 2016: Satisfaction (Rolling Stones tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

-August 24, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), West End Fair, Gilbert

-August 25, 2016: We’ve Only Just Begun: The Carpenters Remembered (Carpenters tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

-August 26, 2016: Bennie and the Jets (Elton John  tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

-August 26, 2016: Land of Ozz (Ozzy Osbourne tribute band), Railroaders Memorial Museum, Altoona

-August 27, 2016: David Stone’s Johnny Cash Experience (Johnny Cash tribute band), Sellersville Theater, Sellersville

-August 31, 2016: Green River (CCR tribute band), TD Bank Amphitheater, Bensalem

 

Tuesday’s Gone Brings Lynyrd Skynyrd to Hatfield, PA

TuedaysGone

Tuesday’s Gone, a North Carolina-based Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute band, performed at School Road Park in Hatfield, Pennsylvania as a part of their annual MusicFeast concert series. This concert was the second in the series.

The band played Lynyrd Skynyrd’s best-known songs and some songs that determined the “real fans from the real fans.” They dedicated “Red, White, and Blue” to the veterans in attendance. They even played “Simple Man,” which audience members were requesting towards the end of the show.

The audience was a wide mix of ages, from the very young to the older folks who grew up listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd. There were a few teenagers and young adults in attendance as well. Tuesday’s Gone took notice of the ages and engaged the audience well accordingly. The wide variety of hits and lesser-known songs introduced the music of Lynyrd Skynyrd to old and new fans alike.

The band looked and sounded just like Lynyrd Skynyrd. They nailed the instruments and the vocals. Their sound was amazing, with the vocals and the instruments in perfect harmony.

They were a fun band to see perform. They brought the whole Lynyrd Skynyrd experience to those who have never seen them and to those who remember seeing them. They communicated with the audience, making it interactive and fun.

Anatomy of a Great Tribute Band

TributeBandAnatomy

A good tribute band can be difficult to come by. They have to wholly encompass the artist or band they are paying tribute to. There are certain things that make for an awesome tribute band concert experience, and the best tribute bands embody all of these things.

The Look
The best tribute bands do their best to look the part. Some tribute bands decide to change their whole look to look like their part. Some band members may even decide to wear wigs to get the hair down. Many bands, however, have to do very little to look the part of the band they are performing as. In many instances, the lead musician requires very little effort to look the part while the backing musicians may take extra steps. Musicians in a tribute band may also opt to use the same instruments or look-alike instruments to look identical to the original band.

The Sound
Great tribute bands can replicate the sound and style of their chosen band. The tribute band can reproduce each song by their choice band, down to the little stylistic nuances. The tribute band, including the instrumentalists, have their music memorized and do not need to rely on cheat sheets to play their music. They put in time and practice to solidify their song. The harmonies are exactly the harmonies of the actual band. The singing and instruments sound exactly like the actual band.

The Personality
Awesome tribute bands embody the personality of the band they are performing as. They have spent hours upon hours “studying” the mannerisms of the musicians and know exactly how to replicate it in their shows. They know the mannerisms down to the dancing and even their hand gestures. These seemingly small things capture the essence of a musician, and the ability for a tribute band to replicate this in their performance adds a whole new level of authenticity to their concerts.

The Fans
The tribute band knows how to engage the audience like the actual band. They do not focus solely on fans who have been to multiple concerts over the years. The tribute band should focus on the entire audience and interact with everyone when possible. The band should encourage concertgoers to sing along, clap, and dance to the songs when the mood fits. The best tribute bands are aware of what the audience is doing and how they are reacting to the music.

The Experience
Many concertgoers go see a tribute band because, for some reason, they are unable to see the actual band or musician live. Geography, finances, and health are factors that can prevent people from seeing a band live. A tribute band may even be paying tribute to a deceased musician. For these reasons, it is crucial for a tribute band to replicate the experience of seeing their chosen band live. Doing so allows those who may otherwise not be able to see a musician to get a glimpse into their performances. It is important for tribute bands to be authentic for this purpose.

Pennsylvania Tribute Band Concerts: July 2016

July2016

July 1, 2016: Kicks (INXS tribute band), Hard Rock Café, Philadelphia

July 1, 2016: Best of the Eagles (Eagles tribute band), Havana, New Hope

July 5, 2016: River of Dreams (Billy Joel tribute band), Southampton Days Fair, Southampton

July 9, 2016: Real Diamond (Neil Diamond tribute band), Pinecrest Country Club, Lansdale

July 10, 2016: Yellow Brick Road (Elton John Tribute Band), Parx Casino, Bensalem

July 11, 2016: Tuesday’s Gone (Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute band), School Road Park, Hatfield

July 13, 2016: Real Diamond (Neil Diamond tribute band), TD Bank Amphitheater, Bensalem

July 13, 2016: River of Dreams (Billy Joel tribute band), Parkside Place’s DeBarth Amphitheater, Upper Gwynedd

July 14, 2016: River of Dreams (Billy Joel tribute band), Anderson Farm Park, Collegevile

July 20, 2016: Real Diamond (Neil Diamond tribute band), Doylestown

July 20, 2016: River of Dreams (Billy Joel tribute band), Franconia Community Park, Telford

July 21, 2016: Real Diamond (Neil Diamond tribute band), Fischer’s Park, Harleysville

July 22, 2016: Penntera (Pantera tribute band), Hard Rock Café, Pittsburgh

July 24, 2016: Rock and Roll Over (KISS tribute band), Havana, New Hope

July 28, 2016: Almost Queen (Queen tribute band), Mohegan Sun, Wilkes-Barre

This page will be updated regularly. Check back often. Contact Ashley if you know of any concerts not mentioned in this list and she will add them.

 

Why Tribute Bands Rock

Many people struggle with the thought of tribute bands. Why not see the real band perform? This question is valid, especially if you have the money to see the actual band live. However, in recent economic struggles, many find it difficult to toss up several hundred dollars for a night out. Many tribute bands look, act, and sound just like the band they are paying tribute to, allowing the audience to experience the band in a less expensive and more personal way.

Many tribute bands are formed to keep the memory of a musician who has died. For example, Almost Queen, a Queen tribute band, seeks to memorialize Freddie Mercury, who died of complications from AIDS in 1991. The man who portrays Freddie looks and sounds just like him, giving younger audience members a chance to have a glimpse of Freddie’s stage presence, even if it is not really Freddie. Many other tribute bands do the same. Many older audience members who have seen the actual performer can remember seeing the band or musician and younger audience members can experience what the musician was like.

Also, some tribute bands are good enough to fill in for the actual band. Consequence of Sound tells of the time where a Foo Fighters tribute band stepped in to perform a gig in London in place of the actual Foo Fighters. Several tribute bands look and sound the part, so they can even go so far as to fill in for the actual band in the case of injury or sickness. This demonstrates their talent and ability to know how to replicate the music they want to.

Many tribute bands, take time out their busy days and nights to express their appreciation to their fans. Almost Queen always takes the time to talk to fans after shows and they communicate with fans through social media. Bruce in the USA, a Bruce Springsteen tribute band, remembers audience members who have been to their shows at Sellersville Theater in Pennsylvania in the past. Many tribute bands are open to audience requests, both before and during a show.

Tribute band shows are cheaper than seeing the actual band. Seeing the actual band can cost several hundred dollars just for the tickets alone. Seeing a tribute band costs a little over $100 for 4 tickets. This allows concert goers to have more money for food and merchandise. With recent economic hardships hitting many people around the world, tribute bands are a less expensive way to experience a musician if someone cannot afford a ticket to see the actual musician or band.

Tribute bands often play at smaller venues. The Railroaders Memorial Museum in Altoona, Pennsylvania holds several tribute bands in their Alive at 5 concert series. Several parks, such as School Road Park in Hatfield, Pennsylvania, hold tribute band concerts as a part of their seasonal concert series. These smaller venues are less expensive than going to a larger theater and are closer, saving money that would have been used for gas. These venues also allow the band to be more interactive with the audience since these venues tend to be smaller.

Concert Review: Bruce in the USA

BruceInUSA

On January 15, 2016, Bruce in the USA performed at Sellersville Theater in Sellersville, PA. This band is a Bruce Springsteen tribute band and they played the hits as well as some less popular songs sung by Springsteen.

This band looked and sounded the part. Matt Ryan, who performs as Springsteen, has a voice that is almost identical to Springsteen’s. His voice has an amazing range and performed all of the songs well. The band, playing the part of the E Street Band, followed suit, performing with Ryan without overpowering his vocals. The harmonies were spot-on with the harmonies by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. The band was high energy throughout the whole show, bringing the crowd to its feet.

People were dancing in the aisles the whole evening. Ryan interacted with the crowd, especially with those who has been to this concert in previous years. Each song flowed one into another with little to no commentary or introductions for the songs, especially the songs that were more well-know.